Terminal Ballistics  
 

I grew up in a family who's values have tended to find things like hunting wrong. It was a large stretch for me when I killed my first animal (a Northern Alberta black bear), and there is always mixed emotions knowing that I am responsable for killing something. When I am out in the field with the intent to kill, I strive for the quickest and most humane way I can find. While there are many skills involved in this, there are also considerations to be made vis a vis equipment that ethically balances the need to eliminate a long drawn out death for the coyote and requirements on pelt damage minimization. As such, it is important for me to gather data from every coyote have killed to try and develop an understanding about what my gun/bullet combination is capable of, and how it is performing under real field situations.  
 
 

The objective
The objective...a dead coyote dropping on the spot with minimal pelt damage.
 
 

In this section of the website, I have put together some information concerning my current load: a .22 hornady 40 grain v-max that push out of my Rmeington 700 at approximatgely 3750 feet per second. In flight ballistics of this load I'll cover in the weapons section of coyotecanada.ca, however what happens once it hits an animal is interesting/complex enough that I felt it warrented it's own page.  
 
 

such a tiny thing
Here it is...while not as small as what those shooting a .17 remington use, for the type of hunting I do on the type of terrain around Calgary, I have found the 40 grain v-max to be the best performer when it comes to what happens once the projectile strikes it's intended target.
 
 
 
WARNING!

The terminal ballistics section of this website contains extremely graphic photographs of bullet wounds on skinned, dead coyotes. These have been posted on this website for their educational value, however if you are squeemish or at all sensitive about these things, then proceed only knowing that you have been warned and have made a concious choice to view such photographs. Clicking on the illustrated coyote will take you to a page detailing a real hunting incident where the illustrated shot actually happened.  
 
 
 
220 degrees Load Data: .223 remington, 40gr v-max
Shot Angle: 220 degrees from gun
Range: 200 yards
Coyote Size: Large male
Exit Wound: No
Organs Damaged: Heart and both lungs
Distance Travelled: Fell where shot
020 degrees
Load Data: .223 remington, 40gr v-max
Shot Angle: 030 degrees from gun
Range: 275 yards
Coyote Size: Average Female
Exit Wound: No
Organs Damaged: Intestines, liver, heart, and left lung.
Distance Travelled: 15 yards
290 degrees
Load Data: .223 remington, 40gr v-max
Shot Angle: 290 degrees from gun
Range: 215 yards
Coyote Size: Average Female
Exit Wound: No
Organs Damaged: Both lungs & heart
Distance Travelled: Fell where shot
090 degrees
Load Data: .223 remington, 40gr v-max
Shot Angle: 090 degrees from gun
Range: 20 yards
Coyote Size: Average Female
Exit Wound: No
Organs Damaged: Both lungs & heart
Distance Travelled: Fell where shot
180 degrees sitting
Load Data: .223 remington, 40gr v-max
Shot Angle: 180 degrees from gun
Range: 300 yards
Coyote Size: Small Female
Exit Wound: No
Organs Damaged: Both lungs & heart
Distance Travelled: 125 yards
 
 
 
 


 
 
image linking to 100 Top Hunting Sites